Historia Scientiarum, No.100-No.109



Second series : international journal of the History of Science Society of Japan
ISSN:02854821
Vol. 20
No.1, Jury 2010, pp. 1- 60
No.2, December 2010, pp. 61-164
No.3, March 2011, pp.165-226
 
Vol. 21
No.1, Jury 2011, pp. 1-90
No.2, December 2011, pp. 91-158
No.3, March 2012, pp.159-230
 
Vol. 22
No.1, Jury 2012, pp. 1-62
No.2, December 2012, pp. 63-158
No.3, March 2013, pp.159-238
 
Vol. 23

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Historia Scientiarum Vol.23 No.1, Jury 2013

Article


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Edmund C.Berkeley as a Popularizer and an Educator of Computers and Symbolic Logic(pp.1-23)
SUGIMOTO, Mai(杉本舞)
Kansai University(関西大学)

Abstract
This paper explores how Edmund C. Berkeley tried to instruct and popularize high-speed computers in the 1940s and 1950s and how Berkeley emphasized the connection between computers and symbolic logic. Berkeley strengthened his conviction in the significance of symbolic logic and Boolean algebra before his graduation from Harvard University and maintained this conviction for more than 30 years. Berkeley published books and articles, including Giant Brains, and sold electrical toy kits by which young boys could learn electrical circuits and their logical implications. The target audience of Berkeley covered wide range of people including those who were not making computers but were interested in using them, that is, amateur adult technology enthusiasts who enjoyed tinkering with technology or reading about science and technology, and young students. In these projects Berkeley used Shannon’s paper of 1938, “A symbolic analysis of relay and switching circuits” as a theoretical basis of his conviction. Design of these kits was fine-tuned by Claude E. Shannon.

Keywords
Edmund C. Berkeley, symbolic logic, computer, Claude E. Shannon, Giant Brains

Note


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The Evolution of the Gender Question in the Study of Madame Lavoisier(pp.24-37)
KAWASHIMA, Keiko
Nagoya Institute of Technology, Omohi College

Abstract
This paper analyses the changes in the image of Madame Lavoisier from the perspective of gender in two centuries worth of academic literature. From her lifetime to the end of the twentieth century, which marked the 200 years anniversary of Antoine Lavoisier’s death, this woman was mainly praised as the quintessential sensible woman who had been dedicated to her husband, the father of the Chemical Revolution. Whereas this was intended as a praise to Madame Lavoisier, an investigation conducted from this perspective does not mean it depicted her as one of the intellectuals of the eighteenth century. On the other hand, a study that attempted to portray who she really was, due to the gender question, could be accused of bias and manipulating the historical documents; furthermore, if such a study adopted an unsuitable methodology, it would only end up emphasizing her as a “”wicked woman””. From the perspective of second-wave feminism, personified by the slogan ”The personal is political””, this paper shows the importance of the perception of Madame Lavoisier as a person who supported the Chemical Revolution in her own right.
Such a perspective demands an analysis of how Marie-Anne Lavoisier has been described more recently, especially before the emergence of second-wave feminism, as well as how the research on her changed after this shift in feminist thought occurred. Such works can answer the question of when scientists attracted attention in history. In particular, this paper will compare the ways that female and male scientific researchers have attracted attention and shed light on the reasons for the difference between how the two sexes have been treated, to stop adopting the view of the strong and the tendency to group humans according to different conditions and think of them as being the same. This research approach will be a usef11l method for not only gender minority studies in the history of science but also for other minority studies.

Keywords
Korean mathematics, geometrical diagrams, use of colors in diagrams,representation of three-dimensional objects

Contents


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CONTENTS OF HISTORIA SCIENTIARUM, Volume 1 – Volume10(pp.59-75)
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Historia Scientiarum, Vol.22 No.3, July 2010


Article 1



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Introduction: Special Issue > Science and Soviet Political Authorities: Conflict, Cooperation, and Incongruence
(pp.159-160)
ICHIKAWA, Hiroshi
Graduate School of the Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University


Article 2


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Science as Co-Producer of Soviet Polity(pp.161-180)
KOJEVNIKOV, Alexei
Department of History, University of British Columbia

Abstract
The cultural authority of science reached its peak during the period of high modernity. Various countries and societies partook in this trend, but it found its ultimate expression within the communist, Soviet-type polity. This article discusses the cultural underpinnings of this characteristic feature of Soviet society and examines one of its major ramifications, the key role of scientific actors in creating and shaping the basic features of Soviet civilization. Examples illustrate this role in different time periods: from building the foundations of the Soviet state in the 1920s, through determining the major vectors of Stalinist economic expansion and industrialization, to designing some key priorities of post-Stalin reforms and the later perestroika. Different types of actors drew their power and inspiration from the cultural authority of science- “bourgeois specialists,” amateur enthusiasts, engineers-turned-politicians, and nuclear physicists. Some of the important legacies they left behind continue to persist today, even if often misattributed, so that a historical analysis is required to uncover their original roots.

Keywords
cultural authority, science and modernity, Soviet polity, experts and political advice


Article 3


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Parallel Worlds : Formal Structures and Informal Mechanisms of Postwar Soviet Mathematics(pp.181-200)
GEROVITCH, Slava
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Abstract
The postwar period is often viewed as the “Golden Age” of Soviet mathematics, yet the mathematical community in that period faced serious constraints. Restrictions on foreign travel, limited access to foreign literature, obsessive secrecy regulations, an obsolete university curriculum, the declining level of the faculty, discriminatory policies in university admissions and employment, and limitations on physical access to universities and research institutions – all these factors worked against the creation of a fully functional research community. This article argues that the thriving of Soviet mathematics in that period was due to the creation of a parallel social infrastructure. Soviet mathematicians organized a network of study groups (“math circles”), correspondence courses, and specialized mathematical schools in major cities, opened free courses for students barred from top universities, offered employment at applied mathematics institutions to talented researchers who were denied academic positions, and developed an extensive system of open research seminars, bringing together multigenerational groups of researchers and fostering collaboration and the spread of new ideas.

Keywords
Soviet Union, mathematics, education, politics, discrimination


Article 4


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Between Ideology and Science : Dialectics of Dispute on Physics in 1920s-1930s Soviet Russia(pp.201-214)
KANAYAMA, Koji
Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Tokyo Institute of Technology

Abstract
This paper examines the relationship between Soviet scientific community and authority in the Stalin era by investigating how specialists of physical sciences and communist ideologues deal with interpretation of physical theories or concepts in the 1920s and 1930s. Soviet physico-philosophical disputes have often been regarded as a persistent attack on modern physical theories by well allied ideologues or ignoramuses. Minute study of historical documents with a consideration of socio-political context tells us, however, that this veiw must be radically revised. Attacks on leading physicists were not well formed, except for the comparatively short period of the Great Terror. Physicists also sought to find the way of description of physics, which is compatible with Marxist ideology dialectical materialism. We will suggest that it will be suitable to grasp the process of dispute as one of acquiring “Soviet Newspeak”, not as a success on showing the correctness or usefulness of physics by leading physicists.Ÿ

Keywords
Dialectical Meterialism, Science in the Soviet Union, Sergei Vavilov, Ideology and Science, Philosophy of Physics


Article 5


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Soviet Physicists during the War : Jealousy, Discord and the Ideological Dispute(pp.215-226)
ICHIKAWA, Hiroshi
Graduate School of the Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University

Abstract
Around the beginning of “the Cold War,” a series of philosophical “discussions” began in various fields of science in the Soviet Union. An intense dispute arouse also in the field of physics. We must not, however, exaggerate the ideological aspect of this issue. Using the newly declassified documents, the author tries to shed a new light on the material and emotional factors behind the ideological guise of this dispute. During the war the majority of the institutes of the Academy of Sciences continued scientific research mainly for military purposes. Significant results were achieved in varous fields of science. At the same time, the wartime experience deepened “rift” between scientists inside and outside of the Academy. Particularly the wartime evacuation of the scientific research institutes and the institutions of higher education to the different places resulted in strenghening the tendency of the functional separation between the Academy of Sciences and universities. The initiation of this assumingly ideologically-motivated campaign in the field of physics rekindled jealousy and hatred accumulated on the side of university professors and lecturers towards some of their “colleagues” with a record of splendid academic and scientific achievements.Ÿ

Keywords
Soviet Physicists, Soviet Ideology, the Academy of Sciences, Moscow State University, Wartime Research, Wartime Evacuation


Article 6


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The Institute of Genetics frm 1939 to 1940 : Reconsidering Lysenko’s Intervention in Soviet Genetics(pp.227-236)
SAITO, Hirofumi
Tokyo Institute of Technology

Abstract
This paper takes up some cases of resistance to Lysenko developing inside and around the Institute of Genetics of the USSR Academy of Sciences from 1939 to 1940. Based on these cases, it reconsiders Lysenko’s intervention in the Institute of Genetics, offering a revision of previous interpretations of it. It thus presents a new picture of Lysenko’s relationship with the Institute of Genetics before Nikolai Vavilov’s arrest. Lysenko’s intervention in the Institute of Genetics was not noticed immediately. Geneticists of the Institute of Genetics were still more influential than biologists of the agrobiology school of Lysenko around April 1940. So Lysenko “strove to” establish his own base in the Institute of Genetics, causing resistance from geneticists.Ÿ

Keywords
The Institute of Genetics, The USSR Academy of Sciences, Lysenko, Vavilov, Soviet genetics


Contents

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CONTENTS OF HISTORIA SCIENTIARUM, No.22

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Historia Scientiarum, Vol.20 No.1, Jury 2010

 

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How Physical Laws Were Understood in Mid-19th Century East Asia : A Comparative Study of Choe Han-gi and Nishi Amane(pp.1-20)
KIM,Sungkhun
Office for History of Science and Technology, University of California, Berkley

Abstract
This article analyzes the work of two Neo-Confucianists, Choe Han-gi (1803-1877) and Nishi Amane (1829-1897), who endeavored to construct the metaphysical ground of modern scientific knowledge in Korea and Japan during the mid-19th century. The influx of Western scientific knowledge into East Asia triggered a reinterpretation of Neo-Confucianism, which had been the main body of traditional knowledge. Nishi and Choe designed the philosophical underpinning that allowed acceptance of modern Western scientific knowledge. This involved division of the ri (理, principle) of Neo-Confucianism into two different concepts, the laws of the physical world and those of the human world. Choe’s and Nishi’s concepts of the laws of the physical world were clearly similar to the laws of nature of modern Western science. Although Nishi and Choe found a way to reinterpret Neo-Confucianism and to construct the metaphysical ground for acceptance of modern Western science, by dividing ri, the significance is that they tried to reconnect the laws of the physical world with those of the human world. This study will attempt to demonstrate Various prototypes for the metaphysical ground of modern scientific knowledge existed in mid-19th century East Asia.

Keywords
Nishi Amane, Choe Han-gi, the laws of the physical world, the laws of the human world, Neo-Confucianism

 


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Far Eastern Vacuum and Electricity : Augustin Hallerstein and Experimental Correspondence between Beijing and Europe(pp.21-46)
JUZNIC,Stanislav
Scientific Research Centre, Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts

Abstract
Hallerstein’s astronomical excellence was widely recognized recently. As one of the prominent scientist attached to the Chinese Imperial Court, he was involved in other types of research besides astronomy, but his authorship was not always obvious amidst the Jesuits’ collective work. Besides astronomical observations the Beijing Jesuits also provided early electricity experiment, which enabled Volta’s inventions of the electrophorus and battery. The development of such devices paved the way for electrical observations that were longer in duration than the quick ones conducted with the Leyden jar. The scientists urgently needed a new approach because they wanted to know the process responsible for an interesting electrical spark. Electric experiments became fashionable in European high society meetings, as vacuum pumps had somewhat earlier. Both innovations were introduced to the Chinese court in Hallerstein’s time, but never garnered the same amount of interest as Western astronomy did. One reason for the Chinese indifference was the nonexistence of a wider technical use for vacuum or electricity during Hallerstein’s lifetime. Ingenhousz and other physicians educated in Leyden eventually developed a broader use of electricity in countries considered somewhat scientifically backward, such as Hallerstein’s native Habsburg monarchy and Japan.

Keywords
Hallerstein, Ingenhousz, Jesuits, Electrophorus, Air Pumps

 


Note


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A History of Entropy through Various Methods : Specially Focused on Technical Term Analysis(pp.47-56)
YAGI,Eri* and OKAMOTO, Tadokoro Rika**
* Toyo University:Eri Yagi Institute for History of Science
** Eri Yagi Institute for History of Science

Abstract
Rudolf Clausius’s 16 papers on the mechanical theory of heat have been studied through four various methods, i.e. traditional text analysis with the help of Clausius’s own manuscripts, mathematical equation analysis, experimental data table analysis, and technical term analysis. The first three analyses were briefly summarized while the result of the last technical analysis was explained with such important terms in thermodynamics as Disgregation (Degree of dispersion) and Uncompensirte Verwandlung (Non compensated transformation). These terms played important roles through indicating the micro nature and irreversible character, respectively before the appearance of the term Entropie (entropy) in Clausius’s famous paper of 1865. The result of technical term analysis for his paper on the theory of electricity (1853) by the use of a text mining method is also shown with tables and figures.

Keywords
R. Clausius, Entropy, mechanical theory of heat,irreversible (non reversible), text mining

 


Book Review


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Book Review: Luís SARAIVA, and Catherine JAMI, eds., The Jesuits, the Padroado and East Asian Science (1552-1773)(pp.57-60)
HASHIMOTO,Takehiko
Department of History and Philosophy of Science, the University of Tokyo
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Japanese Studies in the History of Science, No.12 / 1973

JSHS-No10-1972-front
Japanese Studies in the History of Science, No.12 / 1973
The History of Science Society of Japan, Tokyo
172pp

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Table of Contents
 
Surveys & Documents
Copernicus iaponicus
Suketoshi Yajima
pp.1-3

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Recent Studies in Japan on the History of Chemistry
Masanori Ônuma and Tatsumasa Dôke
pp.5-14

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Outline of a Thesaurus of Nihon Kagaku-Gijutsu-Shi Taikei with Heading List of Classified Key-words
Tetsuo Tomita and Kazutoshi Hattori
pp.15-38

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Articles
The Formation of the Sommerfeld Quantum Theory of 1916
Sigeko Nisio
pp.39-78

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On the Abbe Theory (1873)
Kei-ichi Tsuneishi
pp.79-91

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A Statistical Approach to Nagaoka’s Research in Spectroscopy
Eri Yagi and Tosaku Kimura
pp.93-97

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Yôan Udagawa — A Pioneer Scientist of Early 19th Century Feudalistic Japan
Tatsumasa Dôke
pp.99-120

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Notes for a Study on the Early Scientific Work of the Asiatic Society of Bengal
William A. Blanpied
pp.121-144

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Review
Ferdinand Fellmann: Scholastik und kosmologische Reform(‘Beiträge zur Geschichte der Philosophie und Theologie des Mittelalters,’ N.F. Bd. 6) Münster, Aschendorff, 1971, SS. 70.
Seizo Aoki
pp.145-146

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Ken-Ichi Iida: Nippon Tekkō Gijutsushi Ron (Technology of Iron and Steel in Japan) San-Ichi Shobo, 1973, 466 pp.
Toshio Yamazaki
pp.147-148

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Meiji-zen Nippon Kikaigijutsushi (History of Mechanical Technology in Japan before Meiji-Restoration) By Tomio Hora and Toshiyoshi Kikuchi: Edited by Nippon Gakushiin (Japan Academy). Published by Nippon Gakujutsu Shinkokai (Japan Society for Promotion of Science), Tokyo, 1973. 16+351+42pp
Hiroshi Ishiyama
pp.149-151

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News
pp.152-153

Table of Contents
p.154

Information for Contributors
pp.155-156
 
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Japanese Studies in the History of Science, No.11 / 1972

JSHS-No10-1972-front
Japanese Studies in the History of Science, No.11 / 1972
The History of Science Society of Japan, Tokyo
172pp

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Table of Contents
 
Surveys & Documents
Externalist Approach of Japanese Historians of Science
Shigeru Nakayama
pp.1-10

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Recent Studies in the History of Biology by Japanese Historians
Zenji Suzuki
pp.11-21

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The System of the Book of Charges and Chinese Science..
Peng Yoke Ho
pp.23-39

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Compilation of a Thesaurus and Total Index for Nikon Kagaku-GijutsuShi Taikei by Means of a Computer
Tetsuo Tomita and Kazutoshi Hattori
pp.41-65

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Articles
Origin of the Experiment of Impact with Pendulums
Masahiko Yokoyama
pp.67-72

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The Development of Nagaoka’s Saturinian Atomic Model II(1904-05)— Nagaoka’s Theory of the Structure of Matter —
Eri Yagi
pp.73-89

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Nagaoka’s Geophysical Studies and Their Role in His Physical Researches
Tôsaku Kimura
pp.91-98

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The Origin of the Amber found at Tepe Marlik Cult
W. Beck and Teruko Muroga
pp.99-102

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Ts’ui Fang, a Forgotten llth-Century Chinese Alchemist
Ho Peng Yoke and Beda Lim
pp.103-112

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Einige methodologischen Probleme des klassischen Begriffs der chemischen Struktur und dessen Übergang zum gegenwärtigen Begriff — Beitrag zur Geschichte der Atomistik (V)—
Minoru Tanaka
pp.113-126

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Aoki Konyō (1698-1769) and the Beginnings of Rangaku
Patricia Sippel
pp.127-162

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Review
Tetsuro Nakaoka: Ningen to Rodo no Mirai (the future of man and labor—what can be expected from technological progress?—) Chuokoron, 1970, 214 pp”
Yasuo Shizume
pp.163-165

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News
pp.166-169

Table of Contents
pp.170-

Information for Contributors
pp.171-172
 
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Japanese Studies in the History of Science, No.10 / 1971

JSHS-No10-1971-front
Japanese Studies in the History of Science, No.10 / 1971
The History of Science Society of Japan, Tokyo
188pp

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Table of Contents
 
Surveys & Documents
History of Science and Technology in Japan
Mitsutomo Yuasa
pp.1-16

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Survey of “Science in Colonialism”
Shigeru Nakayama
pp.17-21

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Research Group of the Committee for the Publication of Hantaro Nagaoka’s Biography
Eri Yagi
pp.23-24

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Teaching History of Science in Japan
Masao Watanabe
pp.25-26

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Lettres d’un ingénieur français en Japon de 1877 à 1881 — De P. Ozier à F. Coignet —
Suketoshi Yajima
pp.27-57

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Articles
D’Alembert et Condorcet — Quelques aspects de l’histoire du calc uldes probabilités —
Eizo Yamazaki
pp.59-93

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Pascal et Wallis au Sujet de la Cycloide (III)
Kokiti Hara
pp.95-112

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Paul Langevin and the Theory of Relativity
Camillo Cuvaj
pp.113-142

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The van den Broek Hypothesis
Tetu Hirosige
pp.143-162

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Review
Lynn Weite, Jr.: Machina ex Deo: Essays in the Dynamism of Western Culture, Cambridge, Mass., The MIT Press, 1968,186 pp”
Seizo Aoki
pp.163-164

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Thomas Hawkins: Lebesgue’s Theory of Integration, Its Origins and Development, University of Wisconsin Press, 1970, 227 pp.”
Tamotsu Murata
pp.165-167

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News
pp.168-169

Cumulative Index
pp.170-186

Information for Contributors
pp.187-188
 
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Japanese Studies in the History of Science, No. 9 / 1970

JSHS-No9-1970-front
Japanese Studies in the History of Science, No. 9 / 1970
The History of Science Society of Japan, Tokyo
178pp

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Table of Contents
 
Surveys & Documents
Kyoto Group of the History of Chinese Science
Shigeru Nakayama
pp.1-4

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Activities of Japan’s Group for History of Physics
Tetu Hirosige
pp.5-12

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Philosophy of Science in Japan: 1966-1970
Hiroshi Nagai
pp.13-15

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Articles
Transmission of Indeterminate Equations As Seen in an Istanbul Manuscript of Abū Kāmil
Martin Levey
pp.17-25

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Newton’s Quantitas Materiae
Masao Watanabe & Masakazu Yoshinaka
pp.27-34

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The Genesis of the Bohr Atom Model and Planck’s Theory of Radiation
Tetu Hirosige & Sigeko Nisio
pp.35-47

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Who Invented the Explosives?
Heizo Nambo
pp.49-98

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A Chemical Study on Some Archaeological Samples from Marlik in Iran
Teruko Muroga
pp.99-105

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A Brief Chronology of Dr. Heinrich Burger
Yoshikazu Ishiyama
pp.107-113

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Science Across the Pacific: American-Japanese Scientific and Cultural Contacts in the Late Nineteenth Century
Masao Watanabe
pp.115-136

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The Growth of Scientific Communities in Japan
Mitsutomo Yuasa
pp.137-158

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Review
Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences, Vol. 1, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1969; Joseph Agassi, “Sir John Herschel’s Philosophy of Success,” Ibid., pp. 1-36.”
Masao Watanabe
pp.159-160

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Armin Hermann: Frühgeschichte der Quantentheorie (1899-1913), Physik Verlag, Mosbach in Baden, 1969, 181 pp.”
Tetu Hirosige
pp.161-163

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History of Science Society of Japan (ed.): Nihon Kagaku-Gijutsu-shi Taikei (History of Science and Technology in Japan), 25Vols., 1964–1970.”
Tetsuo Tomtta & Kazutoshi Hattori
pp.164-167

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News
pp.168-169

Table of Contents
pp.170-176

Information for Contributors
pp.177-178
 
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Japanese Studies in the History of Science, No.8 / 1969

JSHS-No8-1969-front
Japanese Studies in the History of Science, No.8 / 1969
186pp

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Surveys & Documents
 
Articles
Sur l’Irrégularité de Numérotation des Figures dans les Lettres de Dettonville
Kokiti Hara
pp.33-54
 
X-rays and Atomic Structure at the Early Stage of the Old Quantum Theory
Sigeko Nisio
pp.55-75
 
The Early Scientific Work of John Milne
John Wartnaby
pp.77-124
 
Chemical and Physical Models for Atomistic Notion-Its Conceptual Development in Relation to the Evolution of the Concept of Chemical Substance. A Contribution to the History of Atomism (IV)
Minoru Tanaka
pp.125-143
 
Establishment of Biochemistry in Japan
Tatsumasa Dôke
pp.145-153
 
Mendel’s Two Genetics Papers Viewed from the Standpoint of Evolution
Yosito Sinotô
pp.155-166
 
Pancreas Known by the Chinese in the Middle Ages
Saburō Miyasita
pp.167-171
 

Review
Shigeru Nakayama: A History of Japanese Astronomy, Chinese Background and Western Impact, Harvard University Press, 1969
Kiyosi Yabuuti
pp.173-175
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News
p.176
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Errata
Errata:Eri Yagi, “On Nagaoka’s Satumian Atomic Model (1903),” No. 3 (1964).
pp.177-178
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Table of Contents, Japanese Studies in the History of Science, No.1/1962 – No.7/1968
pp.179-184
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Suggestions for Contributors
pp.185-186

 
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Shimodaira,K.. (1970). Activities of “the History of Mathematics Society of Japan(Nihon Sugakushi Gakkai)”. Japanese Studies in the History of Science, 8, 1-7

Activities of “the History of Mathematics Society of Japan (Nihon Sugakushi Gakkai)*
Kazuo Shimodaira**
[p.1]
The History of Mathematics Society of Japan started, as the present writer reported previously in our joural***, for the purpose of researches in the history of mathematics in general, not confined in particular fields of mathematics.However, the members of Society are inclined to restrict their field to Japanese mathematics and concentrate their studies in the history of the traditional ones — WASAN****. In fact, most of the members, with the exception of a few, have been keenly interested in WASAN.
The following are the table of contents which appeared in the recent issues of Sugakushi Kenkyu*****(or Journal of History of Mathematics, Japan).
 
K. Shimodaira: “A history of divergent series.” (1967, No.33)
Eiji Chikira: “Sangaku of the Narushima Hachiman Shrine.” (1967, No.33)
Kusuo Takeda: “Chinese mathematics in the stream of the world history.”(1967, No.34)
 
* The address of society is 日本数学史学会(NIHON SUGAKUSHI GAKKAI), Fuji Junior College, 3-chome, Tozuka-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
** Maebashi Technological Junior College, Kamisadori-machi, Maebashi city,Gumma-ken.
*** Japanese Studies in the History of Science, 1966, No.4.
**** 和算 – Japanese Mathematics which was prevalent during the Edo period(1603-1867).
***** 数学史研究The Journal of History of Mathematics, Japan.
 
Shimodaira,K.. (1970). Activities of “the History of Mathematics Society of Japan(Nihon Sugakushi Gakkai)”.Japanese Studies in the History of Science, No.8 (March 1970), p.1
 
Posted in Information of Journals of the Society, Japanese Studies in the History of Science, Japanese Studies in the History of Science, No.8, JSHS | Comments Off on Shimodaira,K.. (1970). Activities of “the History of Mathematics Society of Japan(Nihon Sugakushi Gakkai)”. Japanese Studies in the History of Science, 8, 1-7